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CS0012 Introduction to Computing for the Humanities Project 3

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES
ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS

Intro level college python project

 

Part 1: Representing the grid

We will use two classes to represent the coins in our grid. First, each coin will be represented with the use of a

Coin class. This class should have the following:

• An initializer method __init__(self, type) that accepts the coin’s type as an int (1 for a penny, 5 for a nickel),

stores the type in a data attribute (named type), and initializes another attribute named content to be True.

• An accessor method getType(self) to access the coin’s type.

• accessor and mutator methods for the content attribute (getContent(self), make_content(self))

2

• A __str__(self) method that returns a string representation of the coin (e.g., “5C” for a content nickel or “1D”

for a discontent penny).

Our second class will represent the grid, itself. Your Grid class should have the following:

• An initializer method __init__(self) that creates the grid as a list of lists. The outer list should be called coins.

It should contain 13 nested lists, each one representing a row of the grid. Each of these nested lists will hold

16 items. Each index of each nested list should contain either an instance of a Coin object or the value None

(representing an empty space in the grid).

• This __init__(self) function should assign 58 spaces in the grid the value None (empty spaces), 75 spaces to

an instance of a Coin object with type 1 (pennies), and 75 spaces to an instance of a Coin object with type 5

(nickels). These assignments should be random: for each space in the grid, the initializer should randomly

select from the available types what to place there (None, an nickel, or a penny, as long as there are less than

58 None’s in the grid, less than 75 nickels, and less than 75 pennies). If 75 nickels have already been placed,

all future spaces should only randomly choose between None and pennies (and similarly, if all 75 pennies

have been places, only options left are None and nickels, etc.).

• A __str__(self) method that returns a string formatted to represent the Graph. It should be 13 lines, where

each line has 16 entries. Entries on a line should be separated by a single space. Each entry should either be

the result of calling __str__() on a Coin object or “__” if that entry has the value None.

Note that you will be adding more methods to the Grid class in later parts of the project.

To complete Part 1, you should write a main() function that creates a new Grid object and prints it to the screen.

Because your Coin objects (and empty spaces) are randomly placed, your program should produce a different grid

each time it is run.

Part 2: Finding discontent coins

At this point, each grid that your program produces will be full of seemingly content coins. Your Coin objects are

initialized to be content and so far you have not implemented any code that would change that. For Part 2, you will

implement a method check_content(self) on the Grid class. This function should consider each coin object in the

grid one at a time and check if it is content or discontent. After making this determination, it should set each Coin

object’s content attribute accordingly.

You should consider a coin to be content if 50% or more of its neighbors are of the same type. For each Coin

object, you may have to check up to 8 neighbors. Consider a coin in column j of row i (e.g., the object stored in

coins[i][j]). You may need to check each of the following:

coins[i - 1][j - 1]

coins[i - 1][j]

coins[i - 1][j + 1]

coins[i][j - 1]

coins[i][j + 1]

coins[i + 1][j - 1]

coins[i + 1][j]

coins[i + 1][j + 1]

For the coin stored in column 5 of row 4, this would mean checking the following indices:

coins[4][3]

coins[4][4]

coins[4][5]

coins[5][3]

coins[5][5]

3

coins[6][3]

coins[6][3]

coins[6][4]

coins[6][5]

Further note that not all coins will have 8 possible neighbors. the coin stored in the first column of the first

row (which, because lists are indexed from 0 would be coins[0][0]), only has 3 neighbors: coins[0][1],

coins[1][1], and coins[1][0]. Hence, this coin would be discontent if any 2 of its neighbors were of the

opposite type.

Note that for this part of the project, you should not be moving any discontent coins, yet. You should only check

the status of each coin in the grid (content or discontent).

After implementing check_content(self), modify your main() function to call check_content(self) after

initializing the Grid object, but before printing it.

Part 3: Moving discontent coins

Now you will implement a method move_discontent(self) on the Grid class to move each of the Coin objects in the

grid that are marked as discontent to empty spaces (indices in the nested list data structure that hold a None

value) where they would be content. Once that Coin object is moved, its content attribute should be set to True

using the make_content method. You may move each discontent coin to any space in the grid that is currently

empty and would allow the coin to be content. You have the freedom to decide how move_discontent(self)

accomplishes this.

Note that since you are only setting the content attribute of the moved coins, other coins in the grid may

become discontent as a result of the move. Hence, after a call to move_discontent(self), you will need to call

check_content(self) again to ensure that the state of the grid is accurately reflected.

Once you have implemented move_discontent(self), modify your main() function to allow the user to perform

repeated moves. Your main function should:

1. Initialize a Grid object

2. Ensure that check_content(self) is called on that object

3. Print the Grid object

4. Ask if the user would like to move discontent pieces (by entering “m”) or quit (by entering “q”). Any other

input should be considered invalid.

5. If the user selected to move discontent coins, call move_discontent(self) on the Grid object, ensure that the

check_content(self) is called on the Grid object again, print it again, and prompt the user again.

6. If the user selected to quit, exit the program

Part 4: Processing more iterations

Note that at this point, you are not moving much faster Schelling with his original coins-on-table model. To speed

things up, your program should allow the user to instruct your program to process many repetitions without

stopping. In addition to accepting “m” and “q” at each prompt, if the user enters an integer between 1 and 1000,

your program should process that many iterations, and then display the grid and prompt again (note that this

means that entering 1 or entering “m” would do the same thing). Any integers entered outside of this range should

be considered invalid. 

4

Once you have completed all parts of the lab, be sure to show your work to the lab instructor

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