logo Use CA10RAM to get 10%* Discount.
Order Nowlogo
(5/5)

Provided below is the rubric that will be used to assess and provide targeted feedback

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES
ANSWER ALL QUESTIONS

Jonathon, I am at a loss for how to proceed with providing you with feedback on this deliverable because it appears you have not worked through the relevant course content pertaining to non-data viz visual assets. The distance between what is requested for the deliverable and what was submitted is sufficiently large that I cannot reasonably provide useful feedback along the four rubric dimensions below, so the feedback I am providing here at the top of this document constitutes my feedback in full.

The first problem I encountered is that you have not provided the requested “evolved” storyboard, which meant that I was unable to determine how your non-data viz slides would weave into all other slides. So with regard to understanding how the entire presentation is architected visually, and how that may translate into audience experience, I really cannot say.

Secondly, you seem to have landed on an approach of “one non-data viz slide per Freytag phase.” That isn’t necessarily incorrect, but I wonder why you chose this approach. The inclusion on non-data viz assets should be driven by a desire to reinforce your spoken narrative in very specific ways at very specific points in the presentation. I don’t see evidence of that design effort in the deck you submitted.

Finally, the slides themselves suggest perhaps you were unable to work through the relevant course content on slide design broadly. There are multiple simple but vital best practices that are violated. I won’t recount those here because they are in the course content.

I regret I have to provide such overtly negative feedback, but I suspect it will not come as a complete surprise to you. I encourage you strongly to engage with the relevant course content and reflect that in the final version of the deck you actually use in the final presentation (as well as the SlideDoc).

In terms of grading, because I have no meaningful basis for evaluation along the four rubric dimensions, I have therefore assigned the single overarching grade you see above with no decomposition into sub-components of that grade.

 

 

A Note About Rubrics & Grading

Provided below is the rubric that will be used to assess and provide targeted feedback regarding this assignment. It is important to recognize that all assessment (that is: grading) inherently is subjective. Even when rubrics like the one shown below are used, some amount of subjectivity has been applied in their creation. Furthermore, very often determining what dimensions such as “rigor” really mean also is subjective. So while a rubric is very useful to instructors as they seek to maintain consistency across

 

multiple student submissions, and also is useful in clarifying to students exactly what will be assessed (together with some notion of how it will be assessed), rubrics and grading remain subjective.

You will notice that for each assessment dimension, numeric assessment is on a 100-pt scale. This is intentional. A 100-pt scale is perhaps the only assessment feedback mechanism that Is both time-tested and generally well understood by almost everyone who has been exposed to formal education in the United States. So, for example, a grade of 80 is understood to be a B-, and some qualitative aspect to that grade also enjoys shared understanding across instructors and students alike. The granularity and fidelity that is afforded by applying a 100-pt scale not just to an assignment overall, but to each of its primary components or dimensions, should logically provide the most efficient and easily understood feedback. The overall grade on an assignment is then the weighted average of each of those components. (If no weighting is indicated, then each component of the assignment is weighted equally.)

Naturally, quantitative feedback will be augmented with narrative feedback where appropriate and useful. And that highlights perhaps the most important thing to recognize about assessment and grading: it is some of the most powerful developmental feedback you can receive. Crafted well, grades (together with the all-important narrative feedback) can show you where you have (or have not) mastered important concepts and skills, and can provide critical feedback that should be incorporated in downstream work you undertake in a course. This latter benefit is particularly relevant in this course. In fact, the reason there is a relatively large number of deliverables associated with the Brand Value Project is precisely so that you can receive actionable feedback sufficiently early to reflect on and incorporate that feedback before proceeding to the next project milestone deliverable. Without knowing where you have weak points, you probably are destined to have problems compound throughout the project – an unwelcome situation you would discover far too late in the project to realistically remedy.

So, I ask that you keep in mind these ideas regarding feedback, assessment, and grading. It matters, certainly. And yes, it is subjective. But it also can be remarkably useful in a variety of ways if you focus primarily on the feedback, and only secondarily on the “grade” itself. With that, please see below for the rubric associated with the audience profile assignment.

 

 

Dimension #1: All opportunities to leverage slides have been harvested (25%) – It is important to commit neither sins of omission (meaning that you miss opportunities to use slides to reinforce your story) nor sins of commission (meaning that you use slides in ways that feel forced and that are unlikely to have a useful effect). For example, an image of exceptionally long lines of cars waiting at the drive-through at Blue Sparrow could be easily acquired and likely would be very powerful. But an image like that was not used in the example presentation you saw earlier in the course. That is a fairly serious sin of omission. On the other hand, if a slide containing a bullet list of the steps taken to diagnose the underlying problem at Blue Sparrow had been shown, that would have been “noise” and would have pulled attention away from the presenter…to no good effect. A slide like that would be a sin of commission.

Please see feedback at the top of this document.

100 pts – Every opportunity to leverage slides in the story arc have been identified, and there are no slides that are unlikely to have no effect, or even detrimental effect.

85 pts – One or two of the aforementioned “sins” have been committed.

78 pts – Three or more of the aforementioned “sins” have been committed.

 NOTE: numeric grades between (or potentially below, in extreme cases) the values shown here may be assigned. These grade points are intended to be “way points” in a continuous spectrum of possible assigned grade values.

 

(5/5)
Attachments:

Related Questions

. Introgramming & Unix Fall 2018, CRN 44882, Oakland University Homework Assignment 6 - Using Arrays and Functions in C

DescriptionIn this final assignment, the students will demonstrate their ability to apply two ma

. The standard path finding involves finding the (shortest) path from an origin to a destination, typically on a map. This is an

Path finding involves finding a path from A to B. Typically we want the path to have certain properties,such as being the shortest or to avoid going t

. Develop a program to emulate a purchase transaction at a retail store. This program will have two classes, a LineItem class and a Transaction class. The LineItem class will represent an individual

Develop a program to emulate a purchase transaction at a retail store. Thisprogram will have two classes, a LineItem class and a Transaction class. Th

. SeaPort Project series For this set of projects for the course, we wish to simulate some of the aspects of a number of Sea Ports. Here are the classes and their instance variables we wish to define:

1 Project 1 Introduction - the SeaPort Project series For this set of projects for the course, we wish to simulate some of the aspects of a number of

. Project 2 Introduction - the SeaPort Project series For this set of projects for the course, we wish to simulate some of the aspects of a number of Sea Ports. Here are the classes and their instance variables we wish to define:

1 Project 2 Introduction - the SeaPort Project series For this set of projects for the course, we wish to simulate some of the aspects of a number of

Ask This Question To Be Solved By Our ExpertsGet A+ Grade Solution Guaranteed

expert
Atharva PatilComputer science

539 Answers

Hire Me
expert
Chrisantus MakokhaComputer science

890 Answers

Hire Me
expert
AyooluwaEducation

819 Answers

Hire Me
expert
RIZWANAMathematics

611 Answers

Hire Me

Get Free Quote!

258 Experts Online