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coursework for this module consists of building, and documenting the process of building, a substantial website/web application

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Coursework Specification

The coursework for this module consists of building, and documenting the process of building, a substantial website/web application. From the very beginning you need to be clear that this coursework consists of building and documenting the process of building the website. A lot of the marks will be awarded for your record of its creation and the explanation of the techniques used in developing it.

 

Site Content

Suggestions for the content of the website are provided, however, you are free to suggest subject matter of your own, but this must be agreed in advance with your tutor. The idea for the website/web application needs to be carefully chosen to allow a suitably complex website to be constructed. No two students will be permitted to build websites on the same subject.

The content of the site will have no bearing on the marks awarded, but the logical way it is structured and the way it is presented will, therefore the content should be seen as a vehicle for demonstrating web design techniques. You should not be spending a lot of time writing material, rather you should be using text which is available for reuse (such as text from Wikipedia which can be reproduced as long as it is correctly attributed. Each page should include a notice in the footer that it is a demonstration website developed as an educational exercise and that it incorporates text and media from Wikipedia under the creative commons licence.

 

Assessed Elements

Requirements

The web site/application must have at least 6 pages. In general, these pages will correspond to HTML files, although in certain advanced cases alternative structure will be considered. These pages must be linked together in a logical way with a well-designed navigational approach.  As you are developing a web application, in addition to appropriate content there has to be some interactive features / elements within your website/application. It is expected that…

  • You develop a template, then use this template to develop pages for your site (main area of each page can be different in structure).
  • Home page can be different in structure from the template (succinct introduction to the site; appealing appearance)
  • There has to be a logical separation of the topic into pages
  • Use JavaScript for appropriate features
  • Use PHP for appropriate features

Where possible and appropriate, images, video and audio should be used.

Deliverables

There are two main components to the coursework, the development report, which is worth 80% of the marks, and the website itself, worth 20% of the marks. Details of each of these follow.

  1. Development report

The aim of the report is to detail the work you have done. Imagine that someone is paying you to create this website and now that it is built they are arguing that they should pay less! This report should explain just how much work went into it and what a high quality product it is and why it is worth every penny!

The following sections are required and must be included in your report, but if you have done advanced additional work you should add extra sections to describe that.

Part 1: Web site/application Specification (5% of module mark)

 

You must discuss your final idea with your tutor by week 10. The tutor needs to approve it before you can proceed with the rest. You also need to submit the specification of your web site/application (explanation of what you are developing with some basic sketches) by the end of the same week. You need to upload this to Moodle.

Once your topic has been approved you need to include the specification of your web application in your report. This section should also include a site map, sketches of your pages and anything else that was part of this initial phase.

Part 2: HTML and Site Structure Documentation (15% of module mark)

Site structure

You should describe the structure of your site including:

  • how you have chosen to organise the information it contains and why
  • how you have structured the actual data - typically the links between the various pages, but also any advanced structuring using dynamically loaded content or layers should also be described here
  • how your files are organised on the server - where you store your images, styles and scripts, and why you chose to do it that way
  • Semantic Mark-up - You should explicitly indicate where you have used semantic mark-up and in each case give your reasoning for the way you have used it.
  • Included Media - You should indicate where you have included media files using HTML5 tags to embed them and explain how they work.
  • Validation Reports - You should include the output of the W3C validator set to its experimental HTML5 settings for each of your pages and comment on any warnings it outputs.
  • Browser compatibility notes - You should document any HTML tags or attributes you have used which are not supported across all browsers and comment on your reasons for doing so. It is acceptable to do this as long as you know you are doing it!
  • ENSURE THERE IS COMMENTS IN YOUR CODE TO EXPLAIN WHAT IS DOING WHAT

Describe the structure of the site, do not include styling as it should be in the second part of the report, however, some html code of the site with no styling active might be useful in describing the structure.

Part 3: CSS Documentation (20% of module mark)

 

Main look and feel

You should describe your main look and feel, including:

  • the reasoning behind your choices for layout, colours, fonts and backgrounds
  • sensible screenshots to illustrate it
  • explicit descriptions of how the various styles were implemented:
    • where you have styled HTML tags, say so and say why
    • where you have used styles for IDs, say so and say why
    • where you have used classes, say so and say why
    • explain any complex (nested) selectors you have used
    • where style rules have been cascaded you should explain this
    • where dynamic effects such as transitions have been used these should be thoroughly explained

You should include fragments from your CSS in all these explanations.

 

  • Responsive Design - You should describe how you have made your web application responsive to different screen sizes.
  • Browser compatibility notes - You should document any CSS features you have used which are not supported across all browsers and comment on your reasons for doing so. Illustrate these differences with screenshots if possible. It is acceptable to do this as long as you know you are doing it!

Part 4: JavaScript Documentation (10% of module mark)

You should document all uses you have made of JavaScript. Where you have used JavaScript in preference to using features of HTML5 and CSS3 which could have achieved the same results you should give your reasons for doing so; where you have taken advantage of HTML5/CSS3 features to make JavaScript unnecessary you should also mention that here, although those features will be documented elsewhere in your report.

Part 5: PHP Documentation (10% of module mark)

Your use of server side processing should be documented here. This includes php and database server.

Part 6: Accessibility Evaluation (5% of module mark)

You should document any specific design decisions you made in order to meet the needs of the W3C Web Accessibility Initiative Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, or any aspects of your design which you know do not meet these guidelines. It is more important to demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of the guidelines and that you know whether or not you have followed them than it is to have successfully achieved them.

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